Crowned – Black Women’s Hair Stories

 

 

It was through our conversations that it became apparent that though colonialism and slavery had ended, there was still quite a few paradigms, narratives and ideologiesthat have been carried down from generation to generation. Struggles around identity, selfcare and freedom of expression were discussed as the women shared their experiences of overcoming colonial narratives about afro hair and of reclaiming their beauty. The project was an opportunity to provide a forum that would challenge the misconceptions and biases that have defined our perception of beauty standards for the black community.

It was also a great way to provide insight to our hosting community on some of these topics which, at times may be taken as trivial. There has never been a better time than the present to redefine the terminologies used when describing afro hair. To say the least, our hair is exquisite and defies gravity. It is a rich and thick crown to be worn with pride. It carries the strength and history of our tenacity; it is bold, it is loud and it is enough. This is the time to encourage the next generation of entrepreneurs to focus their research on the creation of Afro hair products.

For too long Afro hair has been side-lined, and now is the time to see the black community showcase its authenticity, beauty and power. This project gave mothers, sisters, daughters and friends an opportunity to learn from one another and to share our excitement of what we can see on the horizon for the deeply diverse beauty that is women of colour.
BY AMANDA TAMARA NYONI & CASSANDRA CORBET.